Deconstructive screenprint (DSP) is a technique developed by American fibre artist Kerr Grabowski, its a technique to apply dye on fabric with a silkscreen. This technique is more environment friendly because the thickener is a natural product called manutex, which is actually kelp. No toxic emulsion is needed to set up the screen. And its easy to clean. Disadvantage is that once the dye has “deconstructed” from the screen to the medium, a new screen has to be prepared. Therefore its more time consuming but results are always unique and cannot be repeated. If you are interested to learn more about this technique have a look at Kerr’s website.

I have done some tests on fabric (cotton works best) but also find it works beautiful on paper. So I gave it a go to do some unique little prints.

DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt
Anything flat with texture can be used to prepare the screen, like leaves, plastic bags, bubble wrap or string.

DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt

The prepared screen has to be completely dry before printing (in the image the thickener with added dye powder is still wet).

DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt
I was so excited with the finished prints, lovely colors, lovely texture.

DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt DSP on paper by Birgit Moffatt
Even the details look gorgeous.
Some of them will be available for sale in my studio on the Kāpiti Arts Trail.

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